Treatment Before ABCs

As I mentioned previously, in the 1990’s medications became available to slow down the progression of multiple sclerosis. These were the interferons: Avonex (β-1α), Betaseron(β-1β), and Copaxone (Glatiramer acetate).  The ABCs heralded an option to proactively treat multiple sclerosis, from what I’ve learned. However, what did people do before the advent of the ABCs? As I also mentioned in an earlier post, it was rather archaic.

When a person with MS experienced an attack/episode/relapse their neurologist would prescribe one of two things: a steroid or a chemotherapy. I had a steroid during one of my two major attacks I’ve experienced. The steroid was a trip through hell, and I’m not even paying attention to the mood swings. It was solu-medrol. This isn’t your typical prednisone people, it is methylprednisolone. The name looks pretty much the same but they are way way different in their effect.  It wasn’t a simple pill to take (I got those during the first attack), it was supposed to be an intravenous administration over five days with a single dose per day. As I mentioned I absolutely loathe needles, and when my neurologist gave me the option to drink the solu-medrol,I took it. After I manged to put down the first smoothie/solu-medrol, I decided to never do that again once the course was finished. Honestly, I think it’d be easier to drink gasoline even though I’ve never tried that. Seriously, heed my advice: do not take the option to ingest solu-medrol. Honestly, that second attack was a doozy, and I’m glad I had something to help get me right again. The diplopia (double vision) I experienced was a horrible and prevented me from doing everyday simple tasks like ride a bicycle or drive. I am so glad it’s in the past now, and I recovered pretty well – my vision returned to normal. I did end up with some numb spots on my body though. Even with the numbness, it was a day of celebration when I realized the diplopia was gone!

As for chemotherapy, I’ve never had to be put on it. Which is a good thing. Having previously used chemo to treat MS increases your chance of developing PML while on Tysabri.  Aside, chemo just has an awful sound to it, plus the hair falling out thing. Luckily, I likely won’t have to face that decision now. Chemo seems so to be an overwhelmingly chaotic and archaic way of treating MS, I wouldn’t even want to contemplate having to take it. It is basically poison they pump into your veins.

So I am thankful there have been a few different treatments that have come out recently. Avonex and Tysabri have saved me from further progression, but there are others. Here is a full listing of medications from the NMSS that are now available to treat MS.

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